Topband 160m links and info

Here are some links to Topband, 160M, web sites in no particular order nor offering any sort of endorsement or recommendation. I am sure there are many more but for the newcomer they offer an insight into what the band is about.

I am about to order some relatively simple gear for 160M in the form of AM receiver and transmitter kits. More to follow.

The RAT5 RX and FAT5 TX kits
Simple but effective, AM,  RX and TX projects for 160m

160 Meter Radio Propagation Prediction Table
The table above represents a rough approximation of radio propagation conditions on 160 meters (affectionately known as Topband). It is to be used as a guide only and is not a definitive forecast. It is based upon selected high-latitude magnetic observatory data which is used to estimate the influence of the auroral oval on 160 meter path propagation (refer to the March and April 1998 issues of CQ Magazine for details: “160 Meters: An Enigma Shrouded in Mystery”, by Cary Oler and Ted Cohen).

The fabulous G4FPH topband WebSDR
Welcome to this WebSDR receiver (running PA3FWM dist11 software – big thanks to Pieter-Tjerk), located near Stafford in central England (IO92AS).

160mt
160 metres being a band like 6 metres offers challenges just above the AM broadcast band is not the easiest band to work DX, operating portable or mobile ETC.
Some AM portable radios can be adjusted to receive 160 metres by adjusting the local oscillator, Car radios can be also adjusted up but they can be very difficult and would suggest using an old unit with AM only.

160m am radio conversion
If you don’t have a general coverage receiver you can convert an ordinary am wireless. As most
broadcast sets cover up to about 1630khz it is possible in most cases to tweak them up to above 1.8mhz.

ONE SIXTY METER CROSSBAND RADIO
Stay tuned to this spot for the latest information on the regular one sixty meter crossband transmissions from vk3ase. Listen from 2230hrs Saturday evening till 0200hrs Sunday morning.  And Wednesday night/Thurs morning (Australian eastern time)on the one sixty, eighty and two meter bands for the largest  amount of bilge imaginable. The content of these missions range from discussions about radio, audio, computing and other related subjects through to social techno babble. Actually most of it is very silly and serves to modulate the carrier to comply with regulations. The program material is drawn from the extensive crossband archive going back 40 years and live missions.

Getting on 160 Meters on a Budget
There are very good reasons why you should not let this fascinating band “slip through your fingers“. The first is propagation. It typically is the last and least likely band to fail under adverse propagation conditions. It is primarily a night time band when it comes to DX due to D-Layer Absorption during the day. At that time, in particular the morning, and at night, it can provide NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence Skywave) mode propagation for local contacts. In times of local disaster when a repeater is down, this mode can get communications over mountains. 80, 60 and 40 meters can equally be used in NVIS mode propagation, depending of ionosphere conditions, but I’m only concentrating on getting you on 160.

160m-top-band-endfed-antenna-g3yeu-iss1-31.pdf
Links to a PDF file to download

Topband in Hawaii
The topband is rough in Hawaii with everyone else 2800 miles or more away. There can be significantly less thunder crashes much of the time versus the mainland. However we get fishing floats. These are believed to be illegal locator transmitters sending slow CW from top to bottom on the band. They are used by fishermen to relocate their drift nets in the Pacific ocean. They send a CW id and then some long dashes typically. The usual “Call Sign” uses three randomly letters, sometimes with a number mixed in.

Topband – 160 meters – Power Line Noise, de NØRQ
The 160 meter band, often affectionately called Topband by enthusiasts, is unique among all the amateur band allocations.  It is the lowest frequency range we can transmit on, and it presents technical challenges similar to the 80m band but in greater degree.  It is also called “the gentleman’s band”, because almost all the operators you’ll find there are good ones.  Technically, I believe that Topband is actually a MF (medium frequency) band, not HF, but those are artificial distinctions.

Top Band Magic: The Inverted L on 160M – brushbeater
JohnnyMac shows the radio world how it’s done. The ability to make and rig your own antennas is one of the cornerstones of communications preparedness- and his success demonstrates the praxis of what I teach. 160 is a big time challenge for a number of reasons- the antenna size being one- and his success at not only making solid regional QSOs but at QRP power levels on SSB no less demonstrates not only what’s possible  but how to do it on the cheap.

http://www.ok1cz.ddamtek.cz/160m_70s.html
160m is a special band. Like many fellow Topbanders I love it for its magic and challenge. I don’t feel like an old timer yet but I thought some of the memories would be of interest to those of my generation and possibly to the younger ones.

http://www.robkalmeijer.nl/techniek/electronica/radiotechniek/hambladen/pw/1991/08/page19/index.html
There’s been a lot of interest in 1.8MHz a.m. operation recently. To get you on Top Band’, the Rev. George Dobbs G3RJV and Ian Keyser G3ROO, have come up with the PW Chatterbox, a complete a.m. station.