Author Archives: Colin Shaw

Contest time again

Having and SDR receiver makes it very easy to look at band activity. Today is the start of the two days of mayhem that is called the CQ WW Contest. What is interesting is the number of stations on the air when the bands are supposed to be dead!

A quick look at 20m at 1104 UTC showed wall to wall phone stations. The antenna is still a mismatched long wire so I guess I was missing the weaker signals.

There were a few stations on 17m but more on 15m. That was surprising and a quick listen found that they were all in eastern Europe and Russia. Good steady sigs with no QSB.

What interests me most is that the bands were not ‘dead’, there were people using them. There may not be the exotic DX out there but even that is still possible at times.

So, the only time we speak to each other now is to scream CQ CONTEST followed by 59 QSL. I bet that could be automated with voice talkers and some nifty software, if it has not been done already.

Update 29/10/2018 I dropped in on a mate working /P from the top of a local hill during the contest. He had modest antennas, a doublet and a 20m vertical both quite low. True he had a bit of power but barely 400W PEP. He had worked all over the world including VP8 on Sunday morning. His comments were the same as mine – who says the bands are dead! Don’t wait for a contest get on the air!

 

 

The history of Rugby radio station

This is a fascinating book about the history of Rugby radio station. It was a huge TX site, part of the HF point to point system and with the well-known LF, MSF transmitters. Now the site has been flattened ready for a housing estate. Why have we not preserved at least some of the HF comms system?

Bearley RX station was paired with Rugby although I never got to visit when it was operational. I vaguely remember the author of the book, he would have been at the Leafield training school at the same time.

Order the book here  (I have no connection with the book or its publishers.)

HF radio communication is not dead!

It seems that the US have tested HF radio as a means of long-distance communication of speech and data. Maybe they have realised that satellites and fibre optic cables are not as safe as they thought.

Satellites are easy to take out as the Chinese demonstrated a while back. There was also a report in the UK press recently about the vulnerability of underwater fibre optic cables.

It is interesting how things go around in circles. It is only ~30 years since the UK closed its point-to-point HF radio system. Now we are looking at HF again for strategic communications. It will be interesting to see what happens.

See the full article here

 

Last transmission from KPH/KPS/KSM

Just love this video on Youtube. It is the last transmission from KPH/KPS/KSM

UA1OM decoded the Morse:
CQ CQ CQ DE KPH/KFS/KSM NW PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE TRADITIONAL CLOSING MESSAGE # DEAR GODDESS THE MEMBERS OF THE MARITIME RADIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY ARE YOUR HUMBLE SERVANTS AND WE THANK YOU FOR PROTECTING US THIS PAST YEAR AS WE CONTINUED OUR STEWARDSHIP OF THE STATIONS KPH AND KSM THE MUSIC OF MORSE HAS GLADDENED THE HEARTS OF MANY AS WE HAVE CROSSED THE BARRIERS OF TIME AND SPACE WE ASK YOUR AND GUIDANCE IN OUR DECISIONS AND ACTIONS DURING THE COMING YEAR THAT WE MAY BE WORTHY OF THE EQUIPMENT AND TRADITION THAT HAS BEEN ENTRUSTED INTO OUR HUMBLE HANDS BLESS ALSO THE EARS AROUND THE WORLD THAT SHARE THE FRUITS OF OUR LABOURS Z UT 73 / 88 DA DE KPH/KFS/KSM CL AR”

Es’hail-2 satellite ground station

I am looking to put together a station for the Es’hail-2 geosynchronous satellite that is about to be launched. Amsat say:  “Qatar’s Es’hail-2 satellite will provide:  “… the first amateur radio geostationary communications that could link amateurs from Brazil to Thailand.”  It will have a narrow band linear transponder with a 2400.050 – 2400.300 MHz uplink and 10489.550 – 10489.800 MHz downlink plus a wideband digital transponder which I will not be using.

At the Microwave group stand at the RSGB convention last weekend I saw a domestic satellite LNB connected to an SDR RX running at 613Mhz. I have the RSP1A and want to try it with an LNB and a 100cm dish for the 10Ghz downlink. The uplink is a bit more complex and I can only think of making a 13cm transverters. There are some kits around, but they are not cheap, and I do not need the RX portion.

The ideal would be conversion of suitable commercial gear. I like to hear about any ideas, suggestions you have especially if you doing something similar. Use email ‘m5fra’ at this site address if you can help. Thanks.

The SDRPlay RSP1A-a momentary lapse

At the RSGB Convention last week I broke my pledge to have a 100% homebrew station. There was a demonstration of an SDRPlay RSP1A right next to the Martin Lynch stand with a small pile of boxes on sale! Not only is it a wide band receiver there is also spectrum analyser software available and all this for just less than £90.

The justification was simple; I build transmitters and need to be able to check the harmonics and other spurious signals to conform to licence regulations. It does not have to be an absolute measurement just the level of the spurious emissions compared to the carrier. And spectrum analysers are expensive.

Then there is the imminent launch of Es’hail, so I need a 10Ghz receiver to listen to it. The conscience clincher was a demo by the microwave group of a modern satellite TV LNA connected to an SDR receiver. Simple. Another reason to get the RSP1A.

And then there is 630m. You get the message, justification for the temptation and I must confess I had a moment of weakness and succumbed. I am trying to atone by finishing the remote tuner.

Not had much time to play but what I have seen is impressive. SDR receivers are incredible, amazing etc. This morning I listened at the top end of 80m for the transatlantic DX spot, 3.798Mhz and was astonished to hear AA8KB at 5-7 on the meter. This is on an untuned inverted L sloper with the high end at about 10m and low end at 6m.

This is a short recording of AA8KB holding the recorder close the the PC speaker.

I can only confess to this lapse and argue that this was a one-off purchase of an extremely useful piece of kit!

The usual disclaimer, no connection with the company and these are my own views.

Update a half hour later. Just gone back to the SDRPlay and found the RF gain was almost turned to minimum.

A lost age – marine HF radio

My first job was as an apprentice at a Post Office HF radio station, Bearley near Stratford-upon-Avon. It was part of the HF point-to-point system that provided worldwide telecommunications. It was state of the art in 1967 and scrapped in 1980.

The station had 50 of the first professional, transistorised communications receivers,  Plessey PVR800s. The early versions had some germanium transistors which proved to be unreliable. They were replaced by the ultra modern silicon types!

They were used for telephony, 4 voice channels on double side band reduced carrier. The audio was inverted so that short wave listeners could not eaves drop.

There were also 50 Marconi HR11, valve telegraphy receivers. Each had the capability running 48 telex services on one radio channel using time division multiplex.

As services were transferred to satellites the station took over the maintenance of UK coast stations used for marine communications. They also suffered the same fate. Eventually all HF communications was taken over by satellites and the point-to-point and coast station were closed down. This Post Office film from 1979 shows something of what HF coastal communications in the “good old days”.

It was then end of an era and still saddens me to think that all the old skills have been lost, particularly commercial Morse.

If you want to read more about the HF point-to-point HF radio network, then see this book by Paul Hawkins who worked at the Dorchester TX station. (click the image >)

Remember, radio amateurs still use Morse!

Also see the Radio Officers Association

Practical Wireless February 1960 – pure nostalgia

At the Newark Hamfest last month there were old copies of Practical Wireless magazine going for £4 each. Having been a reader of the mag since about that time I could not resist.

It is more often the adverts that get me. I remember spending hours drooling over all the ex WWII radio equipment and wishing I had the money to buy some. It did happen a few years later when I was allowed a sol trip to London for the first time. It was a steam train of course.

I was looking for London Central radio Stores in Lisle Street, Soho and did what all kids were told to do and asked a policeman for directions. He looked down on me very suspiciously and asked “now what do you want to go there for lad”. I explained it was for the radio shops and he looked even more suspicious but eventually told me which way to go. I found the shop which obviously had other tenants upstairs who were eager to divert me but the radios were far more interesting!

Here are some adverts and nice little VFO project. I like the sub heading “frequency stability is always a valuable feature”.

PW-1960-002
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There are many more copies available online at this site but you do not get the smell of old magazines.

Next project-GPS locked 10Mhz source

Work is progressing well on the remote antenna tuner, more pics to follow soon. I am already thinking of the next project and decided I need an accurate 10Mhz frequency source for my counter and other stuff. In the past I have used a surplus rubidium standard and when that popped a GPS locked crystal oscillator.

That was over 10 years ago and things have changed. Used Racal Rubidium boxes are on ebay for between, £550 – £811. Bare bones Rubidium standards which need control circuits are priced at £157. These are often units removed from cell phone installations with an unknown lifespan remaining.

There are also lots of ready built Chinese boxes using 1PPS GPS sync for around £100 but in the spirit of making everything myself either from kits or self sourced components I decided to make my own.

QRP Labs have the QLG1 GPS Receiver kit and the ProgRock kit which makes a very cost effective combination. I have no connection with them except being a satisfied customer. Adding a box, power supply and other bits and pieces the estimated the overall cost will be below £40. The kits are ordered and I will share the build here soon.

See my build of a QRP Labs 20m QCX transceiver here

An Extron ADA4 300MX video distribution amplifier can make a cheap way of distributing the 10Mhz signal around the shack/workshop. See this page.